sub  oculis  hostis  /  at  close  range   -   anna  willieme  .  doris  frohnapfel  .  eva  gerd  .  jacopo  benci  .  kate  davis  .  pasquale  polidori  .  regina  huebner  .  roberto  annecchini  .  samantha  clark  .  urs  breitenstein  .  verena  schwab  .  victorine  muller (performance)  ... 

project  curated  by  rebecca r.  rosewarne  with  introductive  text

change  -  studio  d'arte  contemporanea, rome;  15  12  1998   -   13  01  1999

 

 

sub oculis hostis / at close range, detail by exhibition project with urs breitenstein . anna  willieme . jacopo  benci ..., change - studio d'arte contemporanea, rome, 1998. photo courtesy archive change + partner
sub oculis hostis / at close range, detail by exhibition project with urs breitenstein . anna willieme . jacopo benci ..., change - studio d'arte contemporanea, rome, 1998. photo courtesy archive change + partner

 

Primi in omnibus proeliis oculi vincuntur

In every battle, the eyes are conquered first.

Tacitus

 

The English expression "at close range" carries a significance derived primarily from a military context:

at close range with the enemy connotates near enough to see one another's eyes,

near enough, that is, both to look and to be seen. ...

 

...  If  Latin  were treated ad a living language, therefore, sub oculis hostis,  in the presence of the enemy, at close range, might come to connotate an enemy who is actually unseen. What does it mean, in the presence of, if the capacity to look someone in the eye is read as a metaphor of the capacity to harm?

 

with grateful acknowledgement of Carlin A. Barton,

The Sorrows of the Ancient Romans, 1993

 

Rebecca R. Rosewarne, by "sub oculis hostis at close range", catalogue change 1998 and catalogue change 1999 - 2000, 2001.

 

regina huebner, installation photo, 1998. photo courtesy regina huebner
regina huebner, installation photo, 1998. photo courtesy regina huebner